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indiohistorian:

Reflections on the Bangsamoro
Decades in the making, the conflict in the southern parts of Mindanao was born of centuries old problems inherited from our Spanish colonizers in their tactic of divide-and-conquer.  They say that if the Spanish interregnum did not occur, we would have all been Muslim. That is true, for when the Spaniards arrived, most of the powerful polities in Mindanao, and the rulers in Manila were all Muslim. But unlike the Spaniards who used the power of the cross and the sword, the Islamic conversions were mainly for economic reasons, since most of the merchant partners of the datus were Muslim—and Islam then was a very missional (albeit, progressive) religion.  It was here that when the Spaniards saw the strong sultanates of Mindanao and how they stubbornly refused to be subjugated, the Spaniards began calling these people collectively as “Moro,” a term (unbeknownst to most Filipinos today) that hails from the long history of Spanish ethnic cleansing in their Iberian peninsula, when in their Reconquista, they defeated all the Muslim emirates in Spain and tried to erase from their historical memory the enlightened Muslim Moorish heritage that built the beautiful palaces of the kingdoms of Toledo, Cordoba and Granada. It was just logical that the Spanish conquistadors would choose the term “Moro” to refer to all Muslims in Filipinas, who they would call negatively as juramentados.
The term Moro with its loaded meaning unfortunately caught up with our history as down through the ages, from the American imperialist experiment in the Philippines to the time of Filipino politicians, these collective peoples in Mindanao, marginalized, alienated and misunderstood, even fellow Filipinos would call them Moros. It was time then that the peoples themselves used the term in a positive light, an expression of their self-determination and sovereignty as peoples of a shared identity and historical circumstance. They began calling themselves “Bangsa Moro” or the Moro nation. Which is why it is so controversial and promising that the same term would be used in the territory that used to be the ARMM. That’s what makes today’s event, the signing of the Comprehensive Agreement of the Bangsamoro is so significant.
As Muslim mothers and warriors cried in Malacanang in tears of joy, the whole weight of history hangs on us. For the first time in Philippine history, a marginalized people who for the longest time fought for their right to self-determination, exasperated, even adhering to secession from the Philippines, was listened to, acknowledged, and promoted with dignity. A silenced people has been given a voice they can call their own. It is an experiment that has been carefully studied, with all the stakeholders having their own say on their shared destiny. For as Leon Ma. Guerrero said when referring to Rizal’s vision of the Filipino Nation, it must be an entity that is not Spanish, nor Catholic, but that which shares “mutual responsibility” and “respect.” Finally the longest conflict in Southeast Asia is ended. We pray for its success and for the peace and healing of the lands wounded by war and despair.
Together with the rest of the Filipino Nation, on this momentous occasion, we rejoice with our Muslim brothers, acknowledging our faults and weaknesses, and offering our hand of peace, for we are all, in God’s eyes, Filipinos.
Cheers to the Bangsamoro and for the lasting peace in Mindanao!
(Infographic, courtesy of GMA News)

indiohistorian:

Reflections on the Bangsamoro

Decades in the making, the conflict in the southern parts of Mindanao was born of centuries old problems inherited from our Spanish colonizers in their tactic of divide-and-conquer.  They say that if the Spanish interregnum did not occur, we would have all been Muslim. That is true, for when the Spaniards arrived, most of the powerful polities in Mindanao, and the rulers in Manila were all Muslim. But unlike the Spaniards who used the power of the cross and the sword, the Islamic conversions were mainly for economic reasons, since most of the merchant partners of the datus were Muslim—and Islam then was a very missional (albeit, progressive) religion.  It was here that when the Spaniards saw the strong sultanates of Mindanao and how they stubbornly refused to be subjugated, the Spaniards began calling these people collectively as “Moro,” a term (unbeknownst to most Filipinos today) that hails from the long history of Spanish ethnic cleansing in their Iberian peninsula, when in their Reconquista, they defeated all the Muslim emirates in Spain and tried to erase from their historical memory the enlightened Muslim Moorish heritage that built the beautiful palaces of the kingdoms of Toledo, Cordoba and Granada. It was just logical that the Spanish conquistadors would choose the term “Moro” to refer to all Muslims in Filipinas, who they would call negatively as juramentados.

The term Moro with its loaded meaning unfortunately caught up with our history as down through the ages, from the American imperialist experiment in the Philippines to the time of Filipino politicians, these collective peoples in Mindanao, marginalized, alienated and misunderstood, even fellow Filipinos would call them Moros. It was time then that the peoples themselves used the term in a positive light, an expression of their self-determination and sovereignty as peoples of a shared identity and historical circumstance. They began calling themselves “Bangsa Moro” or the Moro nation. Which is why it is so controversial and promising that the same term would be used in the territory that used to be the ARMM. That’s what makes today’s event, the signing of the Comprehensive Agreement of the Bangsamoro is so significant.

As Muslim mothers and warriors cried in Malacanang in tears of joy, the whole weight of history hangs on us. For the first time in Philippine history, a marginalized people who for the longest time fought for their right to self-determination, exasperated, even adhering to secession from the Philippines, was listened to, acknowledged, and promoted with dignity. A silenced people has been given a voice they can call their own. It is an experiment that has been carefully studied, with all the stakeholders having their own say on their shared destiny. For as Leon Ma. Guerrero said when referring to Rizal’s vision of the Filipino Nation, it must be an entity that is not Spanish, nor Catholic, but that which shares “mutual responsibility” and “respect.” Finally the longest conflict in Southeast Asia is ended. We pray for its success and for the peace and healing of the lands wounded by war and despair.

Together with the rest of the Filipino Nation, on this momentous occasion, we rejoice with our Muslim brothers, acknowledging our faults and weaknesses, and offering our hand of peace, for we are all, in God’s eyes, Filipinos.

Cheers to the Bangsamoro and for the lasting peace in Mindanao!

(Infographic, courtesy of GMA News)

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skepticalavenger:

anonymousatheist420:

the atheipope?

Okay, this, here, is in my opinion probably the most important statement that this pope has made, and the one that finally gets me bring down my guard against him a little.  There is nothing atheistic about this pope, but there does seem to be an entirely different philosophy.

Whatever your policies are, it is the black and white thinking of right versus wrong that causes more damage than the policies themselves.  It is one thing to say that you think that abortion is wrong, it is quite another to enforce it to point that the “no exceptions” Tea Party Christians have taken it to.

I’m curious to see the Right Wing’s reaction to this.  It’s going to be a good show.  :)

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the senate allocated P400M, while the house allocated zilch.

no wonder up admin plans to create yet another bracket to gain more money from its students for an education that should have been subsidized by the government in the first place.

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A lot of people volunteered to help out with the relief goods. A girl from Cebu who volunteered to help out got really frustrated with the slowing down of getting the relief goods over to the victims. She noted that many relief goods sent in by Indonesia were already pre-packed in a pouch and ready to distribute but then the volunteers with the DSWD were made to separate and repack the goods. To her, this posed a significant delay in getting the goods to the victims. She felt so bad seeing that other countries had gone out of their way to help out and send relief goods to the Philippines but then the bottleneck had to be in the Philippines with so many unnecessary delaying steps.

The original was in Cebuano and we have placed in a Tagalog and English translation so that more Filipinos can understand it.

Ms. Cherrey Mae Pancho Bartolata has no political agenda whatsoever. She was just frustrated with the delays that the whole repacking caused, knowing that every second counts in getting the already pre-packed relief goods over to the victims who need it most.

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sallydonovan:

Super typhoon Haiyan (known locally as Yolanda), the strongest storm in recorded history, recently hit my country, the Philippines, displacing and devastating thousands in the Visayas region. They are currently in dire need of relief goods, assistance, and monetary donations.

If you are able, please consider making a donation of at least 10 US dollars (about 400 Philippine pesos) via Red Cross Philippines or Habitat for Humanity. Once you do this, you can screenshot your confirmation page, submit it to me and request any kind of graphic you’d like, and I will make it for you. I make graphics mostly for BBC Sherlock, but I will happily do ones for Elementary, Harry Potter, Game of Thrones, Marvel, or any universe you would like.

Reblogs would be greatly appreciated to spread the word. Thank you very much!

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filipeanut:

This post is from:
https://www.facebook.com/ivolunteerphils
For even more opportunities to help:
http://www.rappler.com/move-ph/issues/disasters/43300-reliefph-victims-typhoon-yolanda-help
REPOST (AS OF NOV 13.):
Given the surge in number of volunteers in NROC, there are no more slots available this week for volunteering in the NROC drop-off point for DSWD (https://twitter.com/dswdserves).
But there are other groups that need your help—both helping them pack and giving in-kind/cash donations. We’ve listed a few to help you out:
1) DSWD satellite in Ateneo in partnership with Ateneo DReaM Team and Simbahang Lingkod ng Bayan
Shifts: 8-11am, 11am-2pm, 2-5pm, 5-8pm, 8-10pm
Venue #1: LS College Covered Courts, Ateneo de Manila, QC
Venue #2: Richie Fernando Covered Courts (near Loyola House of Studies), Ateneo de Manila, QC
http://www.admu.edu.ph/disaster-response-and-management-dream-team
For inquiries, you may send a message directly to the SLB Secretariat (https://www.facebook.com/katotoo)
2) Leyte Rep. Ferdinand Romualdez (https://www.facebook.com/ferdinandmartin.romualdez.1/posts/457193541065396)
Venue: Brgy. Valenzuela’s Covered Court, Tanay corner Hormigo St., Brgy. Valenzuela, Makati City
Directions: From Ayala, take JP Rizal jeep, after City Hall, just along Pililia St., ask for Valenzuela Covered Court or Sports Complex. Landmark is Makati City Hall.
3) Philippine Red Cross
Shifts: 8am-2pm (Shift 1), 2-8pm (Shift 2), 8pm-5am (Shift 3)
Note: Only 50 volunteers can be accommodated per shift. Kindly text 09175385446 or tweet @lynvgarcia for your schedule.
Text format: Name, Preferred Shift Schedule and Date, Number of volunteers who will join
Ex. Lyn, Shift 3, Nov 12, 10volunteers
Venue: Philippine Red Cross, Bonifacio Drive, Port Area, Manila. 524-2101
4) Hands on Manila
Until Friday, November 15
Venue: Army gym, Fort Bonifacio Taguig City (map: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151815701804482&set=a.85585234481.80763.80263279481&type=1&theater)
For more information, visit https://www.facebook.com/pages/Hands-On-Manila/80263279481
5) U! Happy Events
Packing of goods is underway at Victory Liner, E. Rodriguez compound, QC (beside Jubilee Christian Academy - http://goo.gl/maps/CFRRu)
But no update yet on following days. Kindly check their page for announcements (https://www.facebook.com/uhappyevents)

filipeanut:

This post is from:

https://www.facebook.com/ivolunteerphils

For even more opportunities to help:

http://www.rappler.com/move-ph/issues/disasters/43300-reliefph-victims-typhoon-yolanda-help

REPOST (AS OF NOV 13.):

Given the surge in number of volunteers in NROC, there are no more slots available this week for volunteering in the NROC drop-off point for DSWD (https://twitter.com/dswdserves).

But there are other groups that need your help—both helping them pack and giving in-kind/cash donations. We’ve listed a few to help you out:

1) DSWD satellite in Ateneo in partnership with Ateneo DReaM Team and Simbahang Lingkod ng Bayan

Shifts: 8-11am, 11am-2pm, 2-5pm, 5-8pm, 8-10pm

Venue #1: LS College Covered Courts, Ateneo de Manila, QC

Venue #2: Richie Fernando Covered Courts (near Loyola House of Studies), Ateneo de Manila, QC

http://www.admu.edu.ph/disaster-response-and-management-dream-team

For inquiries, you may send a message directly to the SLB Secretariat (https://www.facebook.com/katotoo)

2) Leyte Rep. Ferdinand Romualdez (https://www.facebook.com/ferdinandmartin.romualdez.1/posts/457193541065396)

Venue: Brgy. Valenzuela’s Covered Court, Tanay corner Hormigo St., Brgy. Valenzuela, Makati City

Directions: From Ayala, take JP Rizal jeep, after City Hall, just along Pililia St., ask for Valenzuela Covered Court or Sports Complex. Landmark is Makati City Hall.

3) Philippine Red Cross

Shifts: 8am-2pm (Shift 1), 2-8pm (Shift 2), 8pm-5am (Shift 3)

Note: Only 50 volunteers can be accommodated per shift. Kindly text 09175385446 or tweet @lynvgarcia for your schedule.

Text format: Name, Preferred Shift Schedule and Date, Number of volunteers who will join

Ex. Lyn, Shift 3, Nov 12, 10volunteers

Venue: Philippine Red Cross, Bonifacio Drive, Port Area, Manila. 524-2101

4) Hands on Manila

Until Friday, November 15

Venue: Army gym, Fort Bonifacio Taguig City (map: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151815701804482&set=a.85585234481.80763.80263279481&type=1&theater)

For more information, visit https://www.facebook.com/pages/Hands-On-Manila/80263279481

5) U! Happy Events

Packing of goods is underway at Victory Liner, E. Rodriguez compound, QC (beside Jubilee Christian Academy - http://goo.gl/maps/CFRRu)

But no update yet on following days. Kindly check their page for announcements (https://www.facebook.com/uhappyevents)

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marmarmon:

domofosho:

Please note that the Philippine Red Cross site uses PhP (the Philippine Peso) and not USD. 1 USD = 43.19 PHP.

Please consider donating through NAFCON instead. Grassroots orgs in the US are working in solidarity with orgs in the Philippines to bring relief to those who need it most.

About a year ago, I was in the in the Philippines and I ended up helping with some typhoon relief projects and it wasn’t Red Cross or the other large organizations (or the Philippine government) that made it out to the most devastated areas, but the smaller, more grassroots organizations that brought relief and rebuilding to the areas.

(Source: domegranates)

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Houses in Tacloban have been flattened by the massive storm surge that accompanied Typhoon Haiyan.

There’s no clean water, no electricity and very little food.

City officials said they were struggling to distribute aid and that looting was widespread.

In some areas, the dead are being buried in mass graves.

   

a collection of links to how to aid relief operations can be found here as collected by someone.

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TYPHOON HAIYAN RIPS THROUGH CENTRAL PHILIPPINES

Typhoon Haiyan is a Category 5 storm, the strongest typhoon of 2013 and said to be the “most powerful ever” to make landfall (with winds near 195-200 mph). Perspective: Superstorm Sandy was at 95mph when it hit New Jersey; Hurricane Katrina at 129mph when it hit land.

The victims need all the help they can get. Cities have been leveled, buildings made of concrete were destroyed by strong winds and storm surges. Communications have yet to be reestablished in most of the areas affected by the typhoon. The full picture left behind by Haiyan has yet to be established yet the devastation reported on television is already extensive. The government is bracing for large-scale relief operations. Virtually 1/3 of the country has been ravaged by this natural disaster. And we need help.  

HOW THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY CAN HELP

FOR THOSE IN THE PHILIPPINES

HOW TO FILE FOR MISSING PERSONS

Please reblog and add other details I might’ve missed! 

(Source: stannisbaratheon)