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To all the Tumblr users who tend to use tags very liberally:

thejadedkiwano:

Let’s play a game.

Type the following words into your tags box, then post the first automatic tag that comes up.

you, also, what, when, why, how, look, because, never

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if it helps search for it, "Andrew said that he started with Light and Breath, and then Time and Space, as the things you need for creation. Light and Breath being the more metaphysical concepts (especially influenced by Western canon/Christian thought, given that that's deeply fused to our culture), Time and Space being the more quantifiable ones."

Ahhh. That’s a much more detailed comment from her, and gives us some very important information, also confirming some details about how/when Andrew went about coming up with the aspect system that I’d suspected but wasn’t sure of.

Here is the complete comment she wrote on reddit:

I’m gonna hop in from here if that’s okay!! This is another good post.

Andrew said that he started with Light and Breath, and then Time and Space, as the things you need for creation. Light and Breath being the more metaphysical concepts (especially influenced by Western canon/Christian thought, given that that’s deeply fused to our culture), Time and Space being the more quantifiable ones.

He didn’t come up with all twelve aspects right away, either; just the first four, and then the others when he got to that part of the story.

Anyway all this is to basically say that god tier aspects really really invite speculation because there is just enough open space to be fascinating—but no test will really do it. You’re better off thinking it over yourself and choosing what feels right to you.

For a while I was going with Heir of Void as a title for myself but after more stuff I decided on Rogue of Void, it works for me. This was actually two years ago when Andrew put together an info thing for himself on GT aspects—so before Roxy I guess.

I guess the takeaway here is that it’s not really about minutiae; like Homestuck the story and Sburb the game, it’s more about character, both in what your title will be and how your role will take shape. No guarantee that two Rogues of Void will have the exact same abilities, they’ll just be very similarly shaped due to their titles.

Also inversion isn’t a thing I beg everyone to please stop saying inversion

And, similarly important, here’s an earlier response of hers that was quoted just before this:

[…] I’m always really curious to see how people go about coming up with their unified god tier title theories but it seems to me that people pull waaaay too much into it—the titles are meaningful, but definitely do not define every aspect of a player/character, and usually aren’t as all-reaching as they’re posited to be. (For instance: Jade was definitely not using space when she put the bunny together; if anything, she was using her faculty for scientific gadgetry. Not every action a character takes or every thought they have is a result or reflection of their class or aspect.)

I have a lot to say about all this, though I still stand with inversion theory! My extensive comments under the cut.

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The Darkshore Legacy - Prelude

helarniasdragons:

draconicmalcontent:

A found egg is considered a gift from the gods. It’s a piece of their magic coalesced into physical form; to find one is a blessing, but also a duty. To hatch a found egg means the clan has a responsibility to new hatchling to raise them up well, to give them educations equally spread across lore, magic, and battle, and do all they can to raise them to glory.

When one of the clan’s finest warriors brought back a fire egg, it was cause for celebration and ceremony. The entire clan gathered around as Antimony, the clan patriarch, built a special nest, which Vitriol, the clan matriarch, placed the egg into. All held their breaths as Soot, the clan champion, prayed over the egg, asking for the combined blessings of Flamecaller and Lightweaver as she wished the hatchling into being.

The egg began to shake and crack—

image

Silence reigned for a long moment until Antimony cleared his throat. “Well, it’s not quite what we were expecting, was it?” The whole clan looked at him, some with frowns. He tilted his head. “I’m just saying that it’s rather—”

"Father!" Soot exclaimed reprovingly.

"You know, a bit…" Antimony gestured with a paw as he searched for the word.

"Unfor— unusual?" volunteered one of the poets, who grinned uncertainly under Soot’s glare.

Antimony tilted his head the other direction. “No, I was thinking more along the lines of really quite hmlmph—” But whatever the word was, it was lost to Vitriol’s paw, which she had clamped firmly over his mouth.

"She will be a strong warrior," Soot declared, with a warning look at her father. "I name her Darkshore."

[Darkshore - F Guardian, navy/sand/shadow]

Yay, legacy stories!<3

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jtotheizzoe:

Another New Earth… Or Not.
You may have heard the news last week that astronomers discovered the best candidate to date for an Earth-like planet. Kepler-186f is a rocky planet that is, like other so-called “second Earths”, the right distance away from its parent star to have liquid water on its surface and maybe have the right conditions for maybe having life if that’s the kind of thing that maybe exists somewhere else… maybe.
As Adam Mann writes for WIRED, there’s a lot we don’t know about this exoplanet, and a lot that makes it not very Earth-like. Like the fact that its star is way different from ours. And that we haven’t imaged it directly. Matt Francis adds his two cents at The Daily Beast, noting that a planet that close to its parent star is tidally locked, with the same side facing, and being baked by, its parent star all the time. Sounds like it’s more of an Earth-cousin at best.
It’s not right to call this planet a “New Earth” (and I can almost guarantee that the Face of Boe does not and will not ever live there), because there’s just too much that we don’t know about it. The same goes for other exoplanets: For every question they answer they force us to ask three more. But that’s science. What is cool about this latest discovery is that it shows us just how many types of stars, even weird ones like the M class red dwarf that 186f orbits, can harbor Earth-ish planets in their habitable zone. 
The more we discover, the stronger the case that life exists somewhere, elsewhere. If you’d like to know more about our search for exoplanets and the life we hope they harbor, I did two videos on that for IOTBS. Watch ‘em below:
Exoplanets: Are There Other Earths?

Is There Intelligent Life Beyond Earth?

(Image via NASA)

jtotheizzoe:

Another New Earth… Or Not.

You may have heard the news last week that astronomers discovered the best candidate to date for an Earth-like planet. Kepler-186f is a rocky planet that is, like other so-called “second Earths”, the right distance away from its parent star to have liquid water on its surface and maybe have the right conditions for maybe having life if that’s the kind of thing that maybe exists somewhere else… maybe.

As Adam Mann writes for WIRED, there’s a lot we don’t know about this exoplanet, and a lot that makes it not very Earth-like. Like the fact that its star is way different from ours. And that we haven’t imaged it directly. Matt Francis adds his two cents at The Daily Beast, noting that a planet that close to its parent star is tidally locked, with the same side facing, and being baked by, its parent star all the time. Sounds like it’s more of an Earth-cousin at best.

It’s not right to call this planet a “New Earth” (and I can almost guarantee that the Face of Boe does not and will not ever live there), because there’s just too much that we don’t know about it. The same goes for other exoplanets: For every question they answer they force us to ask three more. But that’s science. What is cool about this latest discovery is that it shows us just how many types of stars, even weird ones like the M class red dwarf that 186f orbits, can harbor Earth-ish planets in their habitable zone.

The more we discover, the stronger the case that life exists somewhere, elsewhere. If you’d like to know more about our search for exoplanets and the life we hope they harbor, I did two videos on that for IOTBS. Watch ‘em below:

Exoplanets: Are There Other Earths?

Is There Intelligent Life Beyond Earth?

(Image via NASA)

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i’ve revamped my theme! added a fixed title bar at the top and made some subtle changes in the overall aesthetic.

however, during my fiddling i accidentally broke the two javascript sttuff i use to implement j/k scrolling and the openable sidebar bars, so i have to fix those.

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policymic:

How many Earth twins are out there? Hundreds possibly

NASA’s recent discovery of Kepler-186f, the first habitable Earth-sized planet is big news in humankind’s long search for extraterrestrial life.

A universe full of exoplanets: Thanks to the Kepler Space Telescope, which was launched in 2009 to hunt planets across the universe, we’ve managed to find around 1800 exoplanets so far, many of which have been discovered in just the last year or so.

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